Stones, A Short Catalog

Tandika Star


Bloodstone

Scientific Information

Bloodstone is a member of the Chalcedony family. It is a variety of quartz (silicon dioxide) often with some iron and aluminum. The chemistry is SiO2. It is dark, bright green spotted with red inclusions. The streak is white. This is considered a micro-crystalline variety of quartz and is not found in crystal form.

Environment

Chalcedony is formed in several environments, generally near the surface of the earth where temperatures and pressures are relatively low. It commonly forms in the zone of alteration of lode and massive hydrothermal replacement deposits and as bodies of chert in chemical sedimentary rocks.

Occurrence

India, Germany.

Name

This stone is also referred to as "heliotrope," which is derived from two Greek words which signify "sun-turning". It was given this name because of a notion that when immersed in water it would turn the sun red. Chalcedony is derived from Chalcedon, an ancient Greek city of Asia Minor.

Legend and Lore

This is one of the birthstones for March.

"Who in this world of ours, her eyes
In March first opens, shall be wise.
In days of peril, firm and brave,
And wear a Bloodstone to her grave." (5)

Ancient warriors often carried an amulet of bloodstone which was intended to stop bleeding when applied to a wound.

Magical Properties

Because it is green, it can be used for "money spells". It is also considered a "lucky" stone for athletes because it imparts courage and stamina.

Healing

Heliotrope is used today in conjunction with anything having to do with blood.

Personal Experience

I consider the ancient uses of bloodstone in line with what I use it for today. In addition, I consider it a "cholesterol buster", and wouldn't hesitate to apply it to any with this type of problem. Generally I would use it at the Heart Chakra. I've also used it successfully in situations where I needed "courage" to accomplish something. I will just carry a piece of it in my pocket for this purpose.

Notes

Chrysoprase, carnelian, jasper and agate are all forms of Chalcedony.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  3. Some of the healing information may come from "Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.
  4. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.
  5. Birthstone poem from "The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones" by William T. Fernie, MD

This is more about bloodstone, but I didn't want to include it in the main text. Read on, and you'll see why...

A few years ago, I had a discussion with my daughter (who was about 13 at the time) about the "spiritual essence" of plants and stones. I explained to her that different people "see" this spiritual essence in various forms. Somehow, this led to a discussion of "devas", which she interpreted as "people, but without a body that we can see with mundane eyes."

A few days later, I was reading a novel, reposed on the sofa in my living room. She was sitting on the floor by the coffee table, drawing in her sketchbook with her pastels.

On the coffee table were several stones in a dish. One was an amethyst, one a bloodstone, one was some yellow/green crystal that someone had loaned to me because they wanted my "impressions"...and there were some others that I don't remember now.

I glanced over at my daughter, and she was holding one of the stones in her hands, with her eyes closed. She apparently had achieved some form of "altered state" because her little eyeballs were just wigglin' away (REM).

A while later, I glanced over, and she was drawing a portrait. After she seemed finished and satisfied with what she was doing, I questioned her about it. She said she was drawing the "spirit/deva" of the stones in the dish.

The one for bloodstone was an elf-like, male person. He had dark/black hair, green, slanted eyes, "Spock" eyebrows, and pointed ears. Because of the expression on his face, I asked her what she thought of him. Her comments were: "He is very fierce. I'm kind of afraid of him, because it seems like he is pretty strong and could get mad. He uses weapons...and can fight."

My daughter didn't know anything about the "lore" connected with the stones. In addition, I found that "bloodstone" was very different from any of the other "stone portraits" that she did...The rest were much more "human"...

Brown Jasper

Scientific Information

Brown Jasper, sometimes called "picture" Jasper because of the beautiful variations in coloring, is a type of Chalcedony. It is closely related to Quartz, with the chemistry of SiO2. The color variations are from trace amounts of other minerals, usually iron and aluminum. The hardness is 7.

Environment

Chalcedony is formed in several environments, generally near the surface of the earth where temperatures and pressures are relatively low. It commonly forms in the zone of alteration of lode and massive hydrothermal replacement deposits and as bodies of chert in chemical sedimentary rocks.

Occurrence

Montana, Utah and Wyoming are prolific locations for Brown Jasper in the U.S. In addition, fine specimens have come from Brazil, Uruguay and Egypt. Other colors and forms of Jasper are abundant in California, Texas and Arkansas.

Name

The name Chalcedony is from Chalcedon, an ancient Greek city of Asia Minor.

Legend and Lore

Beautiful Jasper, with light and dark brown markings was referred to as "Egyptian Marble". Various Native American tribes used Jasper as a rubbing stone and some called it "the rain bringer".

Magical Properties

Brown Jasper is balancing and grounding. This stone, carved into an arrowhead, is worn to attract luck. It is a good stone to use after completing a ritual to help you regain your center and become grounded.

Healing

Jasper is stabilizing. It will help to reduce insecurity, fear and guilt.

Personal Experience

I use a piece of Montana Picture Jasper, which is mostly brown and tan with a slight bit of sky or navy blue as a strong grounding stone for those who have an excess of energy at the Splenic Chakra. I've also used the stone as a basis for a "journey"...The stone looks like a scene of the Rocky Mountains. Finally, I've used Picture Jasper as a psychological tool: I will ask someone who is "looking for an answer" to gaze into the stone and describe all the symbols they see. Then I work with the client to form the "symbols" into some sort of answer.

Notes

Agate, Jasper, Flint, Sardonyx, and onyx are all forms of Chalcedony. In addition, particular colors of Chalcedony have specific names, such as Heliotrope, Bloodstone, Chrysophrase and Moss Agate.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  3. Some of the healing information may come from "Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.

Carnelian

Scientific Information

Carnelian is the clear red to brownish red member of the Chalcedony family. It is a micro-crystalline variety of Quartz(Silicone Dioxide) and may contain small amounts of iron oxides. The hardness is 7, and the streak is white.

Environment

Chalcedony is formed in several environments, generally near the surface of the earth where temperatures and pressures are relatively low. It commonly forms in the zone of alteration of lode and massive hydrothermal replacement deposits and as bodies of chert in chemical sedimentary rocks.

Occurrence

Fine carnelian comes from India and South America.

Gemstone Information

Carnelian is used as an alternate birthstone for the month of May. It is normally cut into cabochons, engraved, or made into seal stones or rounded, polished, and pierced for necklaces and other items of jewelry.

Name

The name means "flesh-colored", from [caro], meaning "genitive" and [carnis], meaning "flesh".

Legend and Lore

Carnelian has long been associated with courage and cleansing of the blood. It was believed that the stone would improve one's outlook, making the individual cheerful and expelling fears.

Magical Properties

Katrina Raphaell says that Carnelian can be used to "see into the past". The "Crystal Oracle" says that Carnelian refers to the Self, and Current Conditions. It is a grounding stone, and associated with the Earth. As such, it is considered practical, sensible and balanced. Cunningham associates the stone with the element of Fire. He suggests it as a talisman against Telepathic invasion.

Healing

It is recommended for infertility or impotency. In addition it is used for purification of the blood. It has also been suggested that this stone will stop nosebleeds.

Personal Experience

I call this the "sexy" stone...since I believe it stimulates sexual appetites. I use it in the lower Chakras for infertility and impotency for men(I use Coral as the feminine counterpart.) I always get a good chuckle when I notice a man wearing a LARGE Cornelian belt buckle. In addition, I would use this stone for relief of pain from arthritis in men.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gemstones" by E. H. Rutland.
  3. Other Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gem Cutting", sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
  4. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  5. Some of the healing information may come from "Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.
  6. Some of the healing information may come from "A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.

Coral

Scientific Information

CaCo3, or calcium carbonate in the form of calcite, is the main constituent of calcareous corals; minor constituents are MgCo3, or magnesium carbonate and proteinaceous organic substances, which act as binding agents. At 2.5 to 4, the hardness is slightly higher than that of calcite. The skeletons of corals vary in color: from bright to dark red, slightly orange-red, pink and white.

Environment

In all cases, coral consists of the branching skeletons of animals which live in colonies planted on the seabed at depths varying from tens to hundreds of meters. They are typical of warmish to very warm seas.

Occurrence

The most famous of these organisms is Corallium rubrum, which lives in the waters of the Mediterranean and, despite its name, provides not only red, but orange, pink, and white coral. Similar to this are Corallium elatius, C. japonicum, and C. secundum, which mainly live off the coasts of Japan, China, Indochina, the Philippines, and other archipelagos of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Coral colonies occupy large areas especially in the Pacific, but also near the coast of South Africa, in the Red Sea, and to the east of Australia. These latter colonies, however, consist of madrepore, which has little in common with the corals used as ornaments.

Gemstone Information

Most of the coral used since antiquity as an ornamental material comes from the calcareous skeletons of colonies of marine organisms of the phylum Cnidaria, order Corgonacea, genus Corallium. Corals take a good polish. They also have a certain degree of elasticity and can be heated and bent into bangles. Thin branches were and still are polished, pierced, and threaded, unaltered, into necklaces. Larger pieces are cut into spherical or faceted necklace beads, pear shapes for pendant jewelry, or cabochons. It is also used for carved pieces and small figurines, in both oriental and western art styles. The most highly prized varieties of coral are those that are a uniform, strong bright red.

Name

The name is derived from the Latin [corallium,] related to the Greek [korallion].

Legend and Lore

The oldest known findings of red coral date from the Mesopotamian civilization, i.e. from about 3000 BC. For centuries, this was the coral par excellence, and at the time of Pliny the Elder it was apparently much appreciated in India, even more than in Europe. Red coral has traditionally been used as a protection from the "evil eye" and as a cure for sterility. One of the Greek names for Coral was Gorgeia, from the tradition that blood dripped from the Head of Medea, which Perseus had deposited on some branches near the sea-shore; which blood, becoming hard, was taken by the Sea Nymps, and planted in the sea. (8)

Magical Properties

Coral is associated with Venus, Isis and Water. It has been used as a form of protective magic for children for hundreds of years. Cunningham recommends it as a luck-attractor for living areas. Sailors use it as a protection from bad weather while at sea. Red-orange coral is one of the four element gemstones of the Pueblo Indians. It is one of the four colors used for the directions in the Hopi/Zuni Road of Life. Coral is considered a representative of the warm energy of the Sun, and the southern direction.

Healing

Coral's healing properties are mostly associated with Women, young children and the elderly. For women it is said to increase fertility and regulate menstruation. For young children, it is recommended to ease teething and to prevent epilepsy. For the elderly, it is used as a cure for arthritis.

Personal Experience

I use coral at the lower Chakras for "Women's Healing." In particular, I will use it for disorders relating to female reproductive organs. I also use it magically, to represent female fertility. I have used it with some success for arthritis, but only for women. This is one of the stones that I "reserve" for female/feminine use. (I use Carnelian as the "male" counterpart.) I have not had an opportunity to try it for a young child.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "Simon & Schuster's Guide to Gems and Precious Stones".
  2. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gemstones" by E. H. Rutland.
  3. Other Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gem Cutting", sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
  4. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  5. Some of the healing information may come from "Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.
  6. Some of the healing information may come from "A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.
  7. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.
  8. Some occult lore is from "The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones" by William T. Fernie, MD

Emerald

Scientific Information

Emerald is a type of Beryl, Beryllium aluminum silicate, frequently with some sodium, lithium and cesium. It's chemistry is Be3Al2Si6O18. Beryls range in color from Bright green (emerald), blue, greenish blue (aquamarine), yellow (golden beryl), red, pink (morganite) to white. The streak is colorless. It's hardness is 7-1/2 to 8. The crystals are Hexagonal and they are common. Fine emeralds have velvety body appearance; their value lies in their even distribution of color. Inclusions are common in emerald, but other stones of this group are usually most valuable when free of flaws.

Environment

Beryl develops in pegmatites and certain metamorphic rocks. It occurs with quartz, microcline, and muscovite in pegmatites, and with quartz, muscovite, and almandine in schist of regional metamorphic rocks.

Occurrence

Best emerald comes from Colombia.(NOTE: it is not necessary to spend thousands of dollars for a tiny chip of emerald to add to your healing/ magical collection. If you look around in rock shops, you may be able to come across some "less than perfect" stones that aren't faceted. I've found 4 of them, slightly larger than my fingernail and they were about $3.00 each.)

Name

The name is from the Greek [beryllos] indicating any green gemstone.

Legend and Lore

Emerald is considered a birthstone for the month of May.

"Who first beholds the light of day,
In spring's sweet flowery month of May,
And wears an Emerald all her life,
Shall be a loved, and happy wife." (5)

Magical Properties

"If you wish to bring a love into your life, buy an emerald and charge it with your magical need through your visualization, perhaps while placing it near a green candle. After this ritual, wear or carry the emerald somewhere near your heart. Do this in such a way that it cannot be seen by others. When you meet a future love, you'll know it wasn't the visible jewel that attracted him or her." (3) The Greeks associated this stone with the Goddess Venus. It has come to represent, for many people, the security of love. Emerald, like almost all of the green stones, is also advantageous for business/money ventures.

Healing

Emerald is said to aid perception and inner clarity. Because of this, they are also associated with healing diseases of the eye, and problems affecting eyesight. It was believed that emeralds could counteract poisons and cure dysentery.

Personal Experience

I sometimes use Emeralds in a stone layout. I will use them for their psychological/spiritual values of clarity and perception. If I am using them for this purpose, I use them in the area of the Heart Chakra, in conjunction with Rose Quartz, or Rhodochrosite for balanced energy. I've also used them for prosperity consciousness.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  3. Some of the healing information may come from "Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner. Other sources may be "Stone Power" by Dorothee L. Mella.
  4. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.
  5. Birthstone poem from "The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones" by William T. Fernie, MD

Garnet (Pyrope)

Scientific Information

Pyrope Garnets are from a group of very closely related aluminum silicates. The Chemistry for the Pyrope variety is Mg3Al2Si3O12. These Garnets range in color from deep red to reddish black and on rare occasions from purple and rose to pale purplish red (sometimes called [rhodolite].) The hardness ranges between 6-1/2 and 7-1/2.

Environment

Pyrope occurs with olivine and hypersthene in peridotite of plutonic rocks.

Occurrence

Pyrope Garnets occur in peridotite in Kentucky, Arkansas, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, most Pyrope came from Bohemia, where it is still found today. The main sources nowadays, however, are South Africa, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Australia.

Gemstone Information

The garnet species with red or purple varieties, including Pyrope are considered gemstones. Usually bright red, Pyrope can be a much less attractive brick or dark red. It can be perfectly transparent, but this feature is less visible in dark specimens. It is either made into fairly convex cabochons, or faceted, with an oval or round mixed cut or, more rarely, a step cut. The faceted gems have good luster, rather less obvious in cabochons. The most valuable types are, of course, the transparent ones with the brightest red color. Pyrope is relatively common, although less so than almandine. Very large stones, up to several hundred carats have been found; but these are rare and are found in museums and famous collections.

Name

The name comes from the Greek [pyropos,] meaning "fiery." The name "Garnet" comes from the Latin [granatus,] meaning "seed-like".

Legend and Lore

Pyrope Garnet has long been associated with love, passion, sensuality and sexuality. Some Asiatic tribes used red garnets as bullets for sling bows because they pierced their victims quickly, and could not be seen well in the body when they mingled with the blood. Throughout the ages, Pyrope has been used as a curative for all types of ailments dealing with blood.

Magical Properties

Pyrope is directly linked with the Will. As such, it is a strong stone for the Magician and Shaman. It is associated with Fire and Mars, Strength and Protection. It will help the practitioner tap into extra energy for ritualistic purposes.

Healing

While all Garnets are associated with the Root Chakra, Pyrope is particularly symbolic. It is used for healing when the subject involved has "lost the will to live", since it is directly related to the desire to live and achieve in this lifetime. This stone warms and aids blood circulation, rouses sexuality and heals the reproductive system and the heart.

Personal Experience

If you are already a strong willed individual or have a fiery temper that you need to learn to control, I suggest that you work with the Alamandine Garnets, rather than the Pyropes. This is a good stone to use for treating depression. Very often, when I've "worked" on an individual who has suffered a heart attack, I find that the individual is rather severely depressed (which I think is a side effect of the medication) and has lost the will to continue in this lifetime. I've found that fiery red Pyrope Garnets are a great help in this situation.

Additional Notes

The Latin name [carbunculus,] (small coal or ember), is attributed to all red transparent stones. It is more often applied to Pyropes when they are formed into cabochons than any other stone.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Other scientific information may be from "Simon & Schuester's Guide to Gems and Precious Stones".
  3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gemstones" by E. H. Rutland.
  4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gem Cutting", sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
  5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  6. Other Magical and Healing information may come from "\crystal Wisdom, Spiritual Properties of Crystals and Gemstones" by Dolfyn.
  7. More legends and lore may come from "Stone Power" by Dorothee L. Mella.
  8. Healing information is from "The Women's Book of Healing", by Diane Stein.
  9. Additional healing information may be from "The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones" by William T. Fernie, MD

Garnet (Almandine)

Scientific Information

Almandine Garnets are from a group of very closely related aluminum silicates. The Chemistry for the Almandine variety is Fe2/3+Al2Si3O12. These Garnets range in color from deep red to brown and brownish black. The hardness ranges between 6-1/2 and 7-1/2.

Environment

Almandine occurs in diorite of plutonic rocks, and with andalusite, hornblende, and biotite in hornfels and schist of contact and regional metamorphic rocks.

Occurrence

Well-formed crystals of Almandine have come from Wrangell, SE Alaska; from Emerald Creek, Benewah Co., Idaho; and from Michigamme, Michigan. Gemstone quality material is obtained in large quantities from Sri Lanka and India, where it is also cut; other sources are Burma, Brazil, Madagascar, Tanzania, and Australia.

Gemstone Information

Most red garnets come under the name Almandine, even when their composition is midway between that of Pyrope and Almandine and similar, in many cases, to that of Rhodolite. The reason for this is the similarity in their color and absorption spectrum characteristics. Almandine has a brilliant luster, but its transparency is frequently marred, even in very clear stones, by excessive depth of color. The cabochon cut is widely used, often being given a strongly convex shape and sometimes a concave base, in an effort to lighten the color by reducing the thickness. Rose cuts have also been used, particularly in the past. Nowadays, when the material is quite transparent, faceted cuts are used as well, and sometimes square or rectangular step cuts. Gems of several carats are not uncommon. Faceted or even barely rounded pieces of Almandine, pierced as necklace beads, were very common in the recent past, but are now considered old-fashioned.

Name

The name Almandine comes from [carbunculus alabandicus,] after the city of Alabanda in Asia Minor, where gems were traded at the time of Pliny the Elder.

Legend and Lore

All red Garnet has long been associated with love, passion, sensuality and sexuality. Garnet is considered a birthstone for those born in January

"By her in January born
No gem save Garnets should be worn;
They will ensure her constancy,
True friendship, and fidelity."

Magical Properties

The darker Garnets are associated with the Will and the Source of Life Incarnate. This is who and what we are in this lifetime. This stone is worn for protective purposes, and is thought to drive off demons and phantoms.

Healing

Almandine Garnets are used to heal skin conditions associated with poor circulation. They improve vigor, strength and endurance.

Personal Experience

Almandine Garnets are particularly effective when healing "traumas" that are carried over from a past life and deal with sexuality and heart/love problems.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Other scientific information may be from "Simon & Schuester's Guide to Gems and Precious Stones".
  3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gemstones" by E. H. Rutland.
  4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gem Cutting", sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
  5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  6. Other Magical and Healing information may come from "\crystal Wisdom, Spiritual Properties of Crystals and Gemstones" by Dolfyn.
  7. More legends and lore may come from "Stone Power" by Dorothee L. Mella.
  8. Healing information is from "The Women's Book of Healing", by Diane Stein.
  9. Additional healing information may be from "The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones" by William T. Fernie, MD
  10. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.

Garnet (Spessartine)

Scientific Information

Spessartine Garnets are from a group of very closely related aluminum silicates. The Chemistry for the Spessartine variety is Mn3Al2Si3O12. These Garnets range in color from brownish red to hyacinth-red. The hardness ranges between 6-1/2 and 7-1/2.

Environment

Spessartine occurs with albite and muscovite in granite pegmatites and with quartz and riebeckite in blue schist or regional metamorphic rocks..

Occurrence

Large corroded crystals of Spessartine have come from the Rutherford No. 2 Mine, Amelia, Amelia Co., Virginia; crystals up to 1" in diameter have been found in several pegmatites in the Ramona District, San Diego Co., California; sharp, dark-red, well-formed crystals occur in cavities in rhyolite near Ely, White Pine C., Nevada; and brilliant crystals of Spessartine have been found with topaz at Ruby Mt., near Nathrop, Chaffee Co., Colorado. Gem material comes from the gem gravels of Sri Lanka and Burma. It is also found in Brazil and Madagascar.

Gemstone Information

The gem variety of Spessartine Garnet is uncommon. It tends to be midway between spessartine and almandine in composition. The "aurora red", orange-red or orange-pink color is typical. It has good transparency and considerable luster. It is normally given a mixed, round, or oval cut. The weight does not normally exceed a few carats. Gems of about 10 carats are extremely rare and usually of an atypical, rather dark, unattractive color.

Name

Spessartine is named after an occurrence in the spessart district, Bavaria, Germany.

Legend and Lore

In the 13th century garnets were thought to repel insect stings. A magical treatise, "The Book of Wings", dating from the thirteenth century says "The well-formed image of a lion, if engraved on a garnet, will protect and preserve honors and health, cures the wearer of all diseases, brings him honors, and guards him from all perils in traveling."

Magical Properties

Spessartine is normally considered to be red-orange to orange-pink. Thus it links the "will" with the "desire". It is a good stone to use when casting a spell for your "heart's desire", especially if it is of the orange-pink" variety.

Healing

The orange garnets are linked to the root and the belly chakra. They are beneficial in instances of infertility, dealing with reproductive organs. Mentally, it inspires confidence in personal creativity and self-worth.

Personal Experience

Spessartine is not as effective as Carnelian for instances of infertility. But it DOES help the mental attitude of the individual experiencing the difficulty. It is a warming stone, and works well for increasing circulation in the lower part of the body.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Other scientific information may be from "Simon & Schuester's Guide to Gems and Precious Stones".
  3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gemstones" by E. H. Rutland.
  4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gem Cutting", sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
  5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  6. Other Magical and Healing information may come from "\crystal Wisdom, Spiritual Properties of Crystals and Gemstones" by Dolfyn.
  7. More legends and lore may come from "Stone Power" by Dorothee L. Mella.
  8. Healing information is from "The Women's Book of Healing", by Diane Stein.
  9. Additional healing information may be from "The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones" by William T. Fernie, MD
  10. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.

Garnet (Grossular)

Scientific Information

Grossular Garnets are from a group of very closely related calcium silicates. The Chemistry for the Grossular variety is Ca3Al2Si3O12. These Garnets range in color from yellow, pink and brown through white and colorless. The hardness ranges between 6-1/2 and 7-1/2.

Environment

Grossular occurs with wollastonite, calcite, and vesuvianite in hornfels of contact metamorphic rocks.

Occurrence

Being the commonest of all garnets, it is found in a variety of locations. Fine colorless crystals up to 1/2" across occur in Gatineau and Magantic Cos., Quebec, fine lustrous pale brown crystals up to 3" across were found near Minot, Androscoggin Co., Main, and beautiful white and pick crystals up to 4" across have been found near Xalostoc, Morelos, Mexico.

Gemstone Information

Grossular also has the typical crystal form of garnets, occurring in isolated crystals which are often complete, in the shape of a rhombic dodecahedron, sometimes combined with a trapezohedron. They vary from transparent to semi-opaque. The typical color is light (gooseberry) yellowish green; but they can be a strong to bluish green, honey yellow or pinkish yellow, or even colorless. When transparent, the crystals have good luster. Like other garnets, they have no cleavage. The greenish to yellowish varieties are used as gems. Grossular is not a rare mineral. The types used as gems mainly come from the gem gravels of Sri Lanka (honey yellow variety); the United States, Canada, Mexico, Madagascar, Kenya. The green variety of grossular garnet, discovered a few decades ago and found mainly in Kenya, near the Tsavo National Park, is also known as Tsavorite (or Tsavolite) It is a light, verdant, or dark green, similar to the color of the better green tourmalines and sometimes, it is said, even comparable to African emerald. It has good luster. These gems, which are usually given a round or pear-shaped mixed cut, or occasionally a brilliant cut, are generally small, rarely exceeding one carat and never more than a few carats.

Name

Grossular is from the New Latin [grosssularia,] "gooseberry," because some Grossular crystals are pale green like the fruit.

Legend and Lore

I do not find anything referring specifically to yellow or green garnets in my sources.

Magical Properties

While deep red garnets focus on "Will" and orange-red garnets focus on "Desire", yellow garnets are focused on Personal Power and Personality. In addition they are (because of their color) associated with athletic prowess and Oriental philosophies.

Healing

Being linked to the Solar Plexus Chakra, yellow garnets are energizing. They can be used for the digestive organs, the diaphragm (and the breath) and eyesight. Green garnets center their healing on the Heart Chakra.

Personal Experience

It is difficult to find a green stone that works well for the lower chakras and the lower half of the body. When I do total layouts for individuals with Aids, I use all green stones, whenever possible. The Green garnets work well for this. Since Garnet is the stone of the Root Chakra, the Will, and green is the color of the Heart Chakra, love, circulation, general healing, this stone works exceptionally well. I find that the yellow garnets work better for magical purposes than healing. For healing, there are several yellow stones that seem to work better for me.

Notes

Garnets are used in industry as an abrasive.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Other scientific information may be from "Simon & Schuester's Guide to Gems and Precious Stones".
  3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gemstones" by E. H. Rutland.
  4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gem Cutting", sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
  5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  6. Other Magical and Healing information may come from "\crystal Wisdom, Spiritual Properties of Crystals and Gemstones" by Dolfyn.
  7. More legends and lore may come from "Stone Power" by Dorothee L. Mella.
  8. Healing information is from "The Women's Book of Healing", by Diane Stein.
  9. Additional healing information may be from "The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones" by William T. Fernie, MD
  10. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.

Lazurite (Lapis Lazuli)

Scientific Information

Lazurite is a silicate of sodium calcium and aluminum, with some sulfur. It is a member of the sodalite group. It's chemistry is (Na, Ca)8(Al, Si)12O24(S,SO)4. The color ranges in shades of blue from violet blue and azure blue through greenish-blue. Lazurite is distinguished from sodalite by its deeper color and fine grain. It is also softer and lighter in weight than lazulite. It is dull to greasy and the streak is pale blue. The hardness ranges between 5 and 5-1/2.

Environment

Crystals are rare. It is usually granular, compact, massive. It forms in association with pyrite, calcite, and diopside in hornfels of contact metamorphic rocks. The opaque, vivid blue, light blue, greenish-blue, or violet-blue stone, consisting largely of lazurite but with appreciable amounts of calcite, diopside, and pyrite, is a rock called [lapis lazuli.] The stone is usually veined or spotted. Its value depends largely upon excellence and uniformity of color and absence of pyrite, although some purchasers prefer lapis with pyrite.

Occurrence

Lazurite is a rare mineral in North America, but it does occur on Italian Mt. in the Sawatch Mts. of Colorado; on Ontario Peak in the San Gabriel Mts., Los Angeles Co., and in Cascade Canyon in the San Bernardino Mts., San Bernardino Co., California. The finest lapis lazuli has come from Badakshan in Afghanistan, and less valuable material has come from Russia and Chile.

Name

The name is from the Arabic [lazaward], "heaven," which was also applied to sky-blue lapis lazuli.

Legend and Lore

Lapis Lazuli was a favorite stone of the ancient Egyptians. In the past Lazurite has been burned and ground to form the pigment "ultramarine." It was consider an aid to childbirth, and has long been associated with altered states of consciousness and trance work. Lapis is sometimes designated as a birthstone for December, although turquoise is most common.

Magical Properties

To quote Cunningham: "This stone is used in rituals designed to attract spiritual love. Take an untumbled piece of lapis with a sharp edge. Empower the stone and a pink candle with your need for love. Then, using the lapis lazuli, carve a heart onto the candle. Place the stone near the candleholder and burn the candle while visualizing a love coming into your life." Actually, the most important magical aspect of lapis is it's ability to strengthen psychic awareness. Cunningham says "Despite its somewhat high price, lapis lazuli is one stone every stone magician should own and utilize."(2)

Healing

This stone is used at the Ajina, the Brow Chakra. It's related gland is the pituitary. The pituitary gland is also referred to as the "master gland" because it regulates all of the others. This location is also the center for the eyes, ears, nose and brain.

Personal Experience

I don't often use Lapis for physical healing, unless I feel that there is a "link" between what is manifested as disease, and some conflict of the "higher self". I have used it for brain disorders (tumors, inflammation, etc.) More often, I use it in layouts where the client is trying to achieve an altered state of consciousness.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  3. Some of the healing information may come from "Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.
  4. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.

Lepidolite

Scientific Information

Lepidolite a potassium, lithium, aluminum fluorsilicate mica. Its chemistry is complex: K(Li, Al)3(Si, Al)4O10(F,OH)2. It is pink, lilac, yellowish, grayish white or a combination of all of these. The streak is colorless. It is one of the softer stones, with a hardness of 2-1/2 to 3.

Environment

Lepidolite is confined to granite pegmatites, where it occurs either as fine-granular masses near the core of the pegmatite or as stubby or tabular crystals in cavities. It is commonly associated with microcline, quartz, and tourmaline.

Occurrence

Large fine masses of lepidolite have been mined at the Stewart Pegmatite at Pala, and superb sharp crystals have been obtained from the Little Three Pegmatite near Ramona, both in San Diego Co., California. It has also been mined in substantial amounts in several New England states and in the Black Hills of South Dakota.

Name

The name comes from the Greek [lepidos], meaning 'scale', in allusion to the scaly aggregates in which the mineral commonly occurs.

Legend and Lore

Lepidolite is a stone that could certainly be considered "new age" in the sense that it is just now coming into recognition by healers and magicians. There is no "past lore" on this stone, to the best of my knowledge. Part of this may be due to the fact, that it is native to the United States.

Magical Properties

"This stone soothes anger, hatred or any other negative emotion. To quiet the entire house, place lepidolite stones in a circle around a pink candle." (2)

Healing

Lepidolite is also know as the "Dream Stone". It will protect the individual from nightmares, especially those caused by stress or an upset in personal relationships. It can be used in the same types of circumstances as Kunzite, namely for manic depression or schizophrenia.

Personal Experience

This is one of the most soothing and relaxing stones I've ever held. It is a beauty to look at, and calms the mind enabling it to concentrate on the TRUE source of a problem...instead of running around in frantic circles accomplishing nothing. The more rubellite in the stone, the better it will help the heart and mind work together.

Notes

Lepidolite has been used as a source of lithium. The above description of the appearance of this stone may be deceiving, as I found Cunningham's to be, also. All of the specimens of this stone that I have seen so far have been grey to a pale lavender grey with "sparkles" of the lithium mica embedded in it. The heart-shaped cabochon that I have also has very distinctive crystals of rubellite (pink tourmaline) and veins of white running through it. I was originally looking for a MUCH brighter lavender stone. It is unusual, also, to find specimens that are cut and polished. Usually the stone is too "crumbly" to take a good polish. However, it is equally handsome in rough form.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  3. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.

Malachite

Scientific Information

Malachite is a basic copper carbonate. It's chemistry is Cu2CO3(OH)2. It ranges in color from emerald green through grass green to shades of silky pale green. The streak is light green. It's hardness is 3-1/2 to 4. Crystals are rare. Most gem specimens display distinctive concentric color banding; (alternating dark green and light green bands.)

Environment

Malachite is a secondary copper mineral and develops in the zone of alteration in massive, lode, and disseminated hydrothermal replacement deposits. Associated minerals are azurite, limonite, and chalcopyrite.

Occurrence

The copper mines at Bisbee, Chochise Co., Arizona, are famous for their fine specimens of massive malachite and pseudomorphs of malachite after azurite. Mines at Morenci in Greenlee Co., and at Globe in Gila Co., Arizona, have yielded beautiful malachite specimens, of which some consist of alternating layers of green malachite and blue azurite. Fine malachite has also come from copper mines in California, Nevada, Utah, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.

Name

The name is from the Greek [moloche], "mallow," an illusion to the mineral's leaf-green color. Malachite is used as an ore of copper and as a gemstone.

Legend and Lore

It is said that if malachite is worn, it will break into pieces to warn the wearer of danger.

Magical Properties

Used to direct power towards magical goals. Protective, especially towards children. According to Cunningham, "Small pieces of malachite placed in each corner of a business building or a small piece placed in the cash register draws customers. Worn during business meetings or trade shows, it increases your ability to obtain good deals and sales. It is the salesperson's stone." (2)

Healing

If the malachite is of the blue-green variety, it can be associated with the Sacral Center, or Splenic Chakra (Svadisthana). Here, it's energy branches to the left, to the spleen. (It is intended in this position for those who are celibate.) In addition, if it is grass-green, it can be used at the Lumbar/Solar Plexis Center. "When the malachite is placed at the solar plexus and a piece of green jade is placed at the heart center and a double-terminated quartz crystal is placed between them, people may remember events that have been blocked for years. They may cry or scream. As these buried emotions are brought to the surface and released, a great weight is lifted and they soon feel renewed." (3)

Personal Experience

I am very careful about using Malachite. It has been my experience that the emotions that it releases can be very powerful, to the point of overwhelming some people. On the other hand, if the individual is ready to deal with them (in a "growth" period) it may work out just fine. You could "balance" the emotional content with a pink stone (such as rose quartz) to cut down some on the intensity.

A few years ago, I broke my arm. To do so, I damaged the muscles and nerves in my wrist. I was in a lot of pain, and was searching for what I could do to help the situation. During a journey, I saw malachite, so I found a malachite heart which I held in the palm of the broken arm while meditating. I got a lot of relief from it. Now, if the wrist acts up, I use the heart, taped over the wrist area when I go to bed at night. It seems to help quite a bit. I now recommend malachite for nerve/muscle damage with some success. (4)

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  3. Some of the healing information may come from "Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.
  4. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.

Moonstone

Scientific Information

Moonstone is one variation of Orthoclase. It owes its beautiful silvery to bluish sheen ('adularescence' or 'schiller') to its composition of extremely thin plates of orthoclase and albite. The thinner these plates are, the bluer is the sheen. There are also moonstones consisting mainly of albite. These are less translucent, but they can occur in a variety of colors: grey, blue, green, brown, yellow and white. There are also moonstone cat's-eyes. The chemical composition is KAlSi3O8 and the hardness is 7. The streak is white.

Environment

The potash feldspars are important rock-forming minerals in plutonic, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks. Adularia and sanidine are found usually in volcanic rocks.

Occurrence

The main countries of origin are Ceylon, southern India (the district near Kangayam), Tanzia and Malagasy which, together with Burma, produces some of the finest stones with a deep blue schiller. White adularia crystals up to 2.5 cm (1") across have been found in gold-bearing quartz veins at Bodie, Mono Co., California, and in the silver mines of the Silver City district, Owhyee Co., Idaho.

Gemstone Information

Moonstone is always cut into cabochons, to display the cat's-eye, or schiller.

Name

Adularia (another name for Moonstone) comes from the locality in Switzerland, the Adula Mts.

Legend and Lore

This stone has always been revered because of its lunar attraction. It was believed that the shiller in the stone would follow the cycles of the moon. (Becoming greatest when the moon was full.) In addition, it has always been considered a "feminine, or Goddess" stone.

Magical Properties

Meditation with moonstone calls into consciousness the three-form moon phase goddesses, Diana/Selene/Hecate, the waxing, Full and waning Moon. These are woman as goddess in her ages and contradictions, Maiden/Mother/Crone. Cunningham favors this stone for spells involving love. In addition he has a longish essay on using it for a "diet" stone.

Healing

Because of it's feminine nature, Moonstone has long been considered a "womans healing stone". It is used traditionally for healing/balancing of female organs and hormones.

Personal Experience

I use Moonstone at the Transpersonal Point, for connection to the Goddess and Universal Feminine Energy. This is the connection to dreams and dreaming, feminine "intuition", and "cycles". There are cycles of time, seasons, the moon, stars, etc. I also use/give this stone for those clients who are having difficulty being in tune with the feminine side of their nature. (Everyone has a masculine and a feminine side.)

Notes

In the past, this stone has also been called "Cylon Opal".

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gemstones" by E. H. Rutland.
  3. Other Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gem Cutting", sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
  4. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  5. Some of the healing information may come from "Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.
  6. Some of the healing information may come from "A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.
  7. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.
  8. Birthstone poem from "The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones" by William T. Fernie, MD

Obsidian

Scientific Information

Obsidian occurs as volcanic lava flows that are thick and of limited area. Its black, glassy, lustrous, and often flow-banded appearance makes it rather easy to distinguish from the other volcanic rocks with which it is commonly associated. This mineral forms when a silica-rich magma of granitic composition flows onto the earth's surface, where it solidifies before minerals can develop and crystallize. It is, therefore, an amorphous solid or glass rather than an aggregate of minerals. The hardness of Obsidian is between 6 and 7; it will scratch window glass. Although generally black, it is more or less smoky along translucent to transparent edges; other colors are gray, reddish brown, mahogany and dark green. When it has small white "flower" designs in it, it is called Snowflake Obsidian. It is also possible to find pieces with a sheen, or chatoyance. This is often called Rainbow Obsidian.

Environment

Obsidian is an environment for very few minerals. Lithophysae and spherulites may contain small but beautiful crystals of feldspar, tridymite, and cristobalite.

Occurrence

Some locations of Obsidian bodies are California (Inyo, Imperial, and Modoc Cos.), Oregon (Crater Lake), Wyoming (Yellowstone Park), and Mexico (near Pachuca.)

Name

The name is derived from the Latin name for the mineral, [obsio.]

Legend and Lore

Polished pieces of black Obsidian have been used for Scrying. Primitive peoples once valued obsidian highly, chipping and flaking it into knives, spearheads, and many other implements with razor-sharp edges resulting from the intersecting conchoidal fractures.

Magical Properties

Obsidian is a very protective stone. It is also associated with the inner mysteries of the Goddess, symbolizing entrance to the labyrinth, the womb or the subconscious self.

Healing

Because of its protective qualities, Obsidian is a good stone for those who are soft-hearted and gentle. It will help to guard them against abuse. This stone cleanses toxins from the liver, so it is also good for people who are exposed to environmental pollutants.

Personal Experience

This is the "balance" stone for Clear Quartz Crystals. We jokingly refer to it around here as a "dark sucker"...meaning it will absorb all sorts of negative things. It is also a grounding stone, and I use it at the Base Chakra (below the feet) at the beginning of a layout to keep my client "grounded". In India, the women wear obsidian toe rings for the same purpose. I use Black Obsidian in conjunction with Quartz. If I'm not using Clear Quartz, I use Snowflake Obsidian. I also have a piece of Rainbow Obsidian, but it is relatively new and I haven't finished "conversing" with it, so I have no advice as to how to use it...at the moment.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  3. Some of the healing information may come from "Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.
  4. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.

Opal

Scientific Information

Opal is hydrous silica, often with some iron and aluminum. Its chemistry is SiO2.nH2O; amount of water varies up to 10 percent. It ranges in color from White, yellow, red, pink, brown to gray, blue and even colorless. It is most easily recognized by its rich internal play of colors (opalescence). Its hardness ranges from 5-1/2 to 6-1/2. It is vitreous and pearly. The streak is white. It is not found in crystal form, rather is usually massive, botryoidal, reniform, stalactitic, and/or earthy.

Environment

Opal is a low-temperature mineral and usually develops in a wide variety of rocks as cavity and fracture fillings. It frequently develops as amygdules in basalt and rhyolite of volcanic rock and replaces the cells in wood and the shells of clams.

Occurrence

Common opal is widespread and can be readily obtained at many places, but localities for precious opal are rare and seem to localized in W United States and Mexico. Magnificent examples of opalized wood can be found in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington, and lively green fluorescing opal (hyalite) occurs in seams in pegmatites in New England and North Carolina and in cavities in basalt near Klamath Falls, Oregon. Beautiful precious opal, as a replacement in wood, has been obtained in Virgin Valley, Humboldt Co., Nevada. Excellent fire and precious opal occur in lava flows in N Mexico. Nevada, Australia, and Honduras are sources for black opal; Australia and Czechoslovakia for white opal; Mexico and SW United States for fire opal.

Gemstone Information

Black, dark blue, dark green opal with dark gray body color and fine play of colors is called [black opal;] opal with white or light body color and fine play of color is called [white opal;] and transparent to translucent opal with body color ranging from orange-yellow to red and a play of colors is called [fire opal.] Play of colors depends upon interference of light and is not dependent upon body color. Black opal is the most highly prized, and fire opal is the most valued of the orange and red varieties. Most opal is fashioned into cabochons, but some fire opals are faceted.

Name

The word is from the Sanskrit [upala,] meaning "precious stone."

Legend and Lore

Opal is a birthstone for October.
"October's child is born for woe,
And life's vicissitudes must know;
But lay an Opal on her breast,
And hope will lull those foes to rest." (5)

Opals have traditionally been considered "lucky" stones...but only for those born in the month of October. It has been considered bad luck to wear them if you were born in any other month.

Magical Properties

Opal is considered to be able to confer the gift of invisibility on its wearer. To accomplish this, Cunningham says "The gem was wrapped in a fresh bay leaf and carried for this purpose." He also says, "Opals are also worn to bring out inner beauty. A beauty spell: Place a round mirror on the altar or behind it so that you can see your face within it while kneeling. Place two green candles on either side of the mirror. Light the candles. Empower an opal with your need for beauty - while holding the stone, gaze into your reflection. With the scalpel of your visualization, mold and form your face (and your body) to the form you desire. Then, carry or wear the opal and dedicate yourself to improving your appearance." (2)

Healing

Opals contain all the colors of the other stones, thus, it could be used in place of any of them. (They are akin to quartz crystals, in this aspect.) Generally speaking, Opal is used more frequently for healing the spirit, rather than the physical body.

Personal Experience

Opals are probably my favorite stone. This may be partially due to the fact that they are my birthstone, and I have been surrounded by them all of my life. For me, they are protective and invigorating. I normally use them during Journeying, and when doing "readings" for other...anything where I am using altered states of consciousness. I find that they help me to understand the symbols of my visions in a way that makes them meaningful for others.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) "The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  3. Some of the healing information may come from "Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras" by Joy Gardner.
  4. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.
  5. Birthday poem from "The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones" by William T. Fernie, MD

Vesuvianite (Idocrase)

Scientific Information

Vesuvianite is composed of calcium, magnesium and aluminum silicate, often with some beryllium and fluorine. The chemistry is Ca10Mg2Al4(SiO4)5(Si2)7)2(OH)4. Specimens range from brown and green to a rare yellow or blue. The hardness is 6-1/2.

Environment

Vesuvianite forms by igneous and metamorphic processes. It commonly is metamorphic and occurs with grossular, wollastonite, and calcite in hornfels of contact metamorphic rocks; with chromite and magnetite in serpentinite of hydrothermal metamorphic rocks; and with wollastonite, andradite, and diopside in carbonatites.

Occurrence

Gem-quality Vesuvianite has been obtained from a pegmatite in marble near Sixteen Island Lake, Laurel, Argenteuil Co., Quebec, and beautiful micromount crystals of purplish-pink color occur in massive Vesuvianite at the Montral chrome pit at Black Lake, Megantic Co., Quebec. The blue variety called [cyprine] has been obtained at Franklin, Sussex Co., New Jersey. Fine crystals up to 1-1/2 inches across occur in pale-blue calcite at Scratch Gravel, near Helena, Lewis and Clark Co., Montana, and spectacular material of similar nature occurs at quarries near Riverside, California. Beautiful pale-green massive Vesuvianite ([californite]) occurs in California at Pulga, Butte Co., and near Happy Camp, Siskiyou Co., and crude yellow prismatic crystals occur with grossular at Xalostoc, Morelos, and Lake Jaco, Chihuahua, Mexico.

Gemstone Information

Translucent gray to green or nearly colorless Vesuvianite with green streaks is called [californite], and is often sold as "California Jade." Californite is fashioned into cabochons. Principal sources are the USSR, Italy, Canada and California.

Name

The name "Vesuvianite" is from the original locality at Mt. Vesuvius, Italy. The alternate name, "idocrase," comes from the Greek [eidos,] "form", and [krasis,] "mixture," because Vesuvianite may appear to combine the crystal forms of several other minerals.

Legend and Lore

None found.

Magical Properties

Dolfyn associates this stone with Passion, enthusiasm, warmth and devotion.

Healing

No specific information found, other than what Dolfyn states.

Personal Experience

None. I do not have a specimen of Vesuvianite.

Bibliography
  1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from)"The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals".
  2. Other scientific information may be from "Simon & Schuester's Guide to Gems and Precious Stones".
  3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gemstones" by E. H. Rutland.
  4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from "Gem Cutting", sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
  5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic", by Scott Cunningham.
  6. Some magical and healing information from "Crystal Wisdom, Spiritual Properties of Crystals and Gemstones" by Dolfyn.
  7. More legends and lore may come from "Stone Power" by Dorothee L. Mella.
  8. Healing information is from "The Women's Book of Healing", by Diane Stein.
  9. Additional healing information may be from "The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones" by William T. Fernie, MD
  10. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.
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